Friday, November 28, 2014

Did You Know?


If you are like many homeowners on the hunt for a new garage door, then you are probably curious about the way it will look on your house. You've more than likely driven yourself bonkers trying to figure out which door model, color and materials fits best within your while still getting that appealing look.
As you begin your quest for a new garage door, you may be trying to choose one that looks great in a brochure. But what you should really be looking for is a new door that looks stunning on YOUR HOME!
Garage Door Style Can Add Value To Your Home
Your garage door covers approximately 30% of the front of your dwelling and is visible to all on-lookers on foot and by car. Studies have shown that a well chosen, aesthetically pleasing garage door can actually bump up the curb appeal, price and value of your home anywhere from 1-5%. That means that the right door can make your home more attractive to buyers and even more profitable to you! In the current housing market slump, anything you can do to help differentiate your home and make it more appealing than another is a smart investment.
Investing in a new garage door is not cheap. Installation of a new door will start in the low $500's, for a cheap looking steel pan door, to a few thousand for a custom built wood door. Before moving forward with a fairly large investment on a new door make sure you are going to be happy with the outcome by choosing a door that looks like a million bucks on YOUR home.
Ask your garage door installer if they have a way to show you a picture of what the door you decide on will look like on your house. Today, operations are equipping their technicians with the technology to make those inner-visions a reality before you commit to placing the order. Sales representatives can come to your house with a laptop and digital camera. They take a photo of your house, then feed the images into their laptop. After a few minutes running through their system they can show you exactly what your home will look like with a new door on it. Give it a try!
Remember, what you want is a beautiful looking exterior that not only you enjoy while living in your home, but that others will enjoy when considering to buy your home. Ultimately, what you want is something that is both affordable and looks appealing.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4097163

Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Benefits Of Insulated Garage Doors


You may not think of it when you have a garage, but you need to make sure that your garage door is insulated. There are numerous benefits to this, and most people take it for granted. One of the benefits of having an insulated garage door is that if you have a garage that has a room above it, or a door to the interior of the house, it can prevent cold drafts from coming into the garage. Even if your door is sealed well against the elements, not having insulation in between the door panels can make the inside of the door quite cold, contributing to greater heat loss in the garage itself.
If you are a hobbyist, and have a shop of some kind inside your garage, or need to work on your vehicle, an insulated garage door can lower the need to have an extra heater inside the garage on cold Winter days. Sometimes the garage, even with the doors closed can be almost as chilly as the temperature outside, and if you are always wondering why your garage feels like a Popsicle, the answer could be that your garage door isn't insulated, or insulated with the right materials.
Even if you check and see that there is some Styrofoam granules inside the door, this isn't good insulation. While Styrofoam is all right at dampening sound, granules don't make a good insulator for your garage door. If this is the case, or there is nothing inside at all, then you need to get some Polyurethane foam instead. This attaches directly to the inside of the door panels, and has no gaps. In addition to being a better insulator, it fills up the space, making the doors stronger and more secure.
When you are checking to make sure you have an insulated garage door, you should also check the seals at the top and bottom of the door, as well as between the door panels. They shouldn't be hard and brittle, but nice and flexible, if you find they are hard and starting to crumble, then it is time to replace them as well. Now there are a few options when it comes to insulating your garage doors. You can buy DIY kits, and while this may be a cheaper option, unless you know what you are doing, and have the tools to do the job right, you should let a professional come in and do it for you. A professional is also a good idea, because after your door is insulated, this is going to add extra weight to the door itself, and the opener may need to be readjusted. Readjusting the springs is just too dangerous for an amateur.
While you may think it isn't worth the money, if you have an attached garage, or a room above it, and always wonder why your heating bill is always so high in the Winter time, now you know. Not having an insulated garage door is like leaving a window open all through the cold part of the year. If you want to keep your heating bill down, and be able to enjoy your garage space better, then you need to make sure that your garage doors are insulated.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4647629

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Differences In Garage Door Openers

Type of Drive
There are three basic types of garage door opener drives, and they are belt, chain, and screw. A belt drive has a rubber belt that serves to open and close the door and they are the most quiet type of electric doors available today. Chain drive automatic doors are the oldest type made and continue to be a popular and relatively inexpensive choice. Screw automatic doors have very few moving parts and require very little maintenance compared to the other two. They are also the easiest of the three for a do-it-yourself'er to install in their garage.
The chain drive is the noisiest of the three types, belts make the least noise, and screw type falls somewhere in between the other two. If price is a big consideration, stick with the chain drive and shy away from the belt drive as they tend to be the most expensive of the three.
Power Options
If you have a one-car garage with a relatively light door, a motor smaller than the standard ½ horsepower that is used on two-door garages will get the job done. Heavier doors such as carriage doors will require a more powerful 3/4-horsepower motor. If you have any doubt at all, it is best to always go with more power as the difference in prices between them is minimal.
Light Options
Lights on automatic garage doors are often the primary source of light in the garage. Most standard units can support two 60-watt light bulbs. If you have a larger garage, you may very well want to consider a unit that can support two 100-watt lights.
Safety Options
A remote control entry device is standard on all electric garage door openers. However you do have a choice as to what the remotes can do. Standard openers have only one button and only serve to open the garage door on command. Others come with multiple buttons that can operate more than one door and do other tasks. You can also find roller garage doors that have keyless entry pads. These can be used to manually enter a code that opens the door or they can be programmed to recognise fingerprints for those looking for a more secure system that cannot be broken into easily by thieves.
Consider all of these options before you buy your electric garage find the right one to meet your expectations and needs.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.co

Saturday, November 15, 2014

My Garage Door Won't Open, Now What?

Professional garage door repair companies hear this question frequently. It seems like it almost always happens to most people as they are about to leave for work, or when they arrive home from a long day. I suppose that being locked out of the garage would be the better of the two previous options. However if you are experiencing this problem, you do have options!
There are several things that you can check for that may be an immediate fix to the problem. First, you can confirm that the garage door opener is receiving power. If it is not, there are two simple things to check for.
Many garages have a GFCI plug system, and all the outlets in the garage are on the same circuit. Once you have located the GFCI plug, try pushing the reset button. If this doesn't work, try checking your circuit breakers. Since many people run freezers, refrigerators, tools, and exercise equipment in the garage, you may have overloaded the breaker.
If neither of these two options corrects the problem, and you have confirmed that the garage door opener is not working, try disengaging the garage door opener from the garage door. This is accomplished by pulling on the emergency release rope that is attached to the trolley on the garage door opener rail.
After disengaging the opener, you should be able to open the door freely. If you determine that the opener is not the problem, your options become a little less appealing.
After ruling out the opener as the problem, you will need to move on to the garage door itself. Take a couple of minutes and try to determine if there seems to be anything loose or broken on the garage door. Look for rollers out of track, cables off of their pulleys, and broken springs.
If you are able to locate one of these problems, you must determine if your do it yourself skills will allow you to quickly make the necessary repairs. Before you make any repairs, make sure that you take the necessary time to determine the safety of making the repair yourself.
Cables and springs are under tremendous amounts of pressure, in order to counterbalance the weight of the door and can cause serious injury if you do not have the proper tools and expertise required to manipulate them.
If you determine that the repair is beyond your abilities, you should know that there are many service companies that are able to help you with your problem rather quickly. Most garage repairs can be completed in less than thirty minutes by an experienced repair technician with the proper tools and parts.
Now is the time to be especially careful. Most areas have a large selection of garage door repair service companies to choose from. Some of these will take advantage of your need for immediate service, if you do not take the time to check them out.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4294676

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Garage Door Springs, The Danger Zone

Usually, the largest mechanical thing around your house is the overhead garage door - the one you're driving your car through, sometimes without even opening it - I know that you do :-).
The major, and the most dangerous component of the overhead door is the garage door spring - (or springs depending on the design), which supports the entire weight of the door panels (sometimes over 400 pounds) and helps you to lift / lower the entire door assembly. I have personally installed 3 overhead garage doors with 2 different types of springs, and you do have to trust me on that - garage door springs are under enormous pressure and you can get seriously injured or even killed when performing such work. If you decide to take your chances - it is imperative that you follow instructions to the last detail! Even if you have a friend or a professional doing it for you, read it and check everything after the installer finishes the job. The garage overhead doors have no safety brakes (at least I haven't heard about any), that would prevent it from falling down when the supporting spring fails. I've found some US patents for such devices, but apparently none of them were ever implemented into an actual garage door.
According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, garage overhead door related accidents account for thousands of injuries every year (average of 30000 per year). For example, these injuries are: fractures, crushings and amputations. It is believed that not all injuries are reported in the United States . (CPSC)
There are basically two types of the garage door spring systems utilizing tracks / side rails (at least these are the most common types in Illinois and probably the rest of US):
1. garage door torsion spring(s) which are wound-up on a rod above the garage door opening top section ( door header)
2. garage door extension springs that are attached on either side of the door and stretch along the horizontal part of the track when the door is closed
You might also have an old, one piece door that swings outward as it goes up and overhead. This particular design will have springs mounted on the sides of the door opening - at about your waist height, secured to a lever bracket system that extends the springs toward the ceiling at the door closing. It is an old and extremely dangerous system, not manufactured anymore. If you have such a system in the garage, I'd highly recommend replacing it.
Garage door torsion springs - there are either single or double spring designs. The spring will usually break while under the maximum stress which is when the overhead garage door closes / travels down, or it is already completely closed (USUALLY). If you're closing it manually and it happens during this operation, don't try to prevent it from crushing down, let it go ... well, unless your foot is where the door will slam!
When one of the two garage door springs breaks you need to have them both replaced at the same time! It will cost some extra money, but having an old and new spring installed will:
- put much more stress on the new one
- the door will loose proper balance
- the remaining old garage door spring will most likely break soon
Torsion springs for residential overhead garage doors have anywhere between 5000 - 30000 cycles life span. Those digits represent an average total number of times you should be able to open and close your door before anticipating garage door spring replacement.
Garage door extension springs - you might have either one or two on each side of your overhead garage door A critical issue with those springs is to have a safety cable installed inside of each single spring and secured properly, so when the door opens and closes, the spring can freely slide on this cable! When the garage door spring snaps without the cable inside, broken ends might severely injure anyone standing within their range. The cables should be always included with the overhead garage doors hardware (assuming that they came equipped with extension springs), but A LOT OF PEOPLE either forget to install them, or don't read instructions and maybe assume that they are not required. Unlike the torsion spring, which doesn't really show any visual wear until it breaks, extension spring wear is much easier to spot, because they simply change dimensions: the coils are over-stretched (best visible when the garage door is open). If you notice such a behavior on your garage door springs - it's time for a replacement.
And for both types of the garage door springs - their tension should be evenly adjusted (on a two spring system) so the overhead door travels properly in its tracks - to test it, stop the door slightly above the garage floor (1" or two) and make sure that its bottom / top edge are perfectly horizontal. Measuring the gap along the bottom might not be the best way to confirm that, because the garage floors are often out of level. Placing a level somewhere in the center section of the garage door top edge would give you the best readout (remember that the door should not be closed completely!). When the springs are properly adjusted, you should be able to raise and stop the garage door at any height, and it should stay at this level without any assistance ( garage door opener arm disconnected).
Important things to remember:
1. Check the rollers / hinges, cables, and the overhead garage door springs often to ensure they are in good working condition
2. Educate your children about garage door safety
3. Never leave children and disabled persons unattended near or in a garage door path
4. Keep your body clear of the door path when closing
5. Don't leave a personal property underneath an open garage door
6. Read more about the garage door opener and other garage components


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1537371

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Garage Door Maintenance Tips

Without proper garage door maintenance, you may face expensive repairs or even replacement of your door or opener. Garage doors are the largest moving part of the home, and potentially operate multiple times each day. Although parts are built to last, even under light use, periodic care and maintenance is required. If you regularly maintain your garage door, keep up the good work and you will be rewarded with a long-lasting, reliable door. If you aren't performing garage door maintenance tasks or having your overhead door serviced, here are some tips to get you started
DIY Maintenance
Although some parts of your garage door need professional service, you can take care of some maintenance items yourself. Every three to six months, visually inspect all components from the inside and out, looking for rust, loose hardware, cable wear, and bent or broken parts. As you raise and lower the door, observe the operation for any hitches or jerks. Spray WD-40 on all tracks, rollers, hinges, springs and latches. Wipe them down with a cloth, then apply a light duty household oil to lubricate. Clean the inside and outside of the door with a household detergent. Car wax applied to a metal garage door helps maintain the finish and keep the door clean (check manufacturer's recommendations first). If your door is wood, apply fresh paint or sealer each year. Finally, check the weather-stripping around the door and replace any that has cracked or broken.
Professional Maintenance
Although a handy homeowner can do some garage door maintenance, a professional service company must perform some tasks. If your door is torsion spring operated, periodic professional maintenance is critical to keep the spring free from rust and operating correctly. Failure to keep up the spring can result in breakage and possibly damage or injury as a result. Chain-driven doors also need a professional's touch, to properly lubricate the opening mechanism.
Automatic Door Opener Maintenance
Garage door openers require routine, professional maintenance every year; however, you must also do a few basic tests yourself each month. Optic sensors and the door's reversing mechanism prevent accidents, and checking them for proper operation takes only a moment. Use a long-handled tool (broom, rake) and wave it between the sensors as the door lowers. If the sensor is working properly, the door will reverse and re-open. To test the reversing mechanism, lay a piece of wood on the ground where the door will hit and close the door. If the reverser is working properly, it will reverse and re-open upon hitting the wood. Listen for any unusual grinding or scraping sounds during operation. Finally, test all remote controls and key pads for proper function.
A professional garage door company has the tools and experience to test all the critical aspects of your door, including balance and force. A pro can give your garage door a tune-up and fix any damaged or worn components at the same time. Experts recommend having professional service at least once each year, just prior to the extreme seasons of weather. If possible, have your overhead door serviced professionally in both spring and fall. With just a little attention to garage door maintenance, you can rest assured that your door will provide reliable and safe operation all year-long.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8676113